Should a parent ever make comments about a child’s weight if they are overweight? Or is it better for them to just bite their tongue?

This is understandably an issue that has parents disconcerted all over the country. If they do mention something, they risk the child developing an eating disorder later in life, while if they just keep their mouths shut, they feel as though they are passing up a chance to save their kids from what may potentially become a threatening life-long health hazard.

New research shows: Never comment on your kid’s weight.

This new research was published in the Eating & Weight Disorders journal. It shows that, although usually well-meant — the parents’ comments regarding their child’s weight often become precursors to harmful dieting behavior, overindulging as well as other potential eating disorders. It can unintentionally build upon negative stereotypes regarding the weight that kids attribute to themselves.

Especially when it comes to girls, what a mother or father says about her weight could have health consequences for her for years following. It can contribute to a girls’ chronic dislike of her own physical appearance… even when she’s not at all overweight.

“Parents with children who are diagnosed with obesity may be concerned, but it is the matter in which those concerns are addressed that could have a detrimental long-term impact,” says Rebecca Puhl, deputy director at the University of Connecticut of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

“The effect it has on girls might be especially damaging”, says Puhl, because “young women are exposed to numerous ideals about body weight and thinness, and too often a woman’s value is linked closely to their physical appearance. If the parents do not challenge these messages, they can be internalized by their daughters.”

The new research study that was conducted involved more than 500 girls between 20 and 35. They were presented with questions regarding how they viewed their body, and they were also asked how often their parents had made comments regarding their weight. The women who recalled the comments their parents made about their weight were significantly more likely to believe they should lose 10 to 20 pounds… even when they were not overweight at all.

The lead author of the study, professor and CornellUniversity’s Food and Brand Lab director Dr. Brian Wansink, noted the comments of the parents’ to have a “scarring influence.”

“We had asked these girls to comment on how often parents had said something about their weight. However, the most important issue was if they had recalled any comments at all, it was just as bad as if it happened frequently,” stated Dr. Wansink, who wrote the book “Slim by Design.” “Any comment at all seems to have lasting repercussions.”

Certain research has linked the parents’ negative remarks to a heightened risk of obesity. A massive government-subsidized research project which followed 1000’s of ten-year-old girls discovered, at the beginning of the research project, nearly 60% of these girls had said either a teacher, sibling, parent, or peer had said to them they were overweight. When they were nineteen years old, the girls that had been told they were overweight had an increased likelihood of being obese, even if they were overweight at ten years old or not.

Family members were the ones that had the greatest influence on the girls.

Certain research discovered that when parents tell their teenagers who are overweight to watch what they eat, they are at an increased risk of depression and lower self-esteem and of becoming obese within the next five years.

A study by a professor at the University of Minnesota, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, discovered when parents discussed weight loss with their teens, the teenagers had an increased likelihood of diet, use harmful weight loss methods, and then result in overeating. This is not as likely to happen when parents talk to their children about healthy eating behaviors, instead of the child’s weight or weight loss options.

Negative statements regarding the weight of a child may send the message that the parents are “connecting the child’s perceived value to their,” Dr. Puhl says, which can invoke negative emotions and low self-esteem. “Kids are taking that to heart and believe they are not okay as a human being. This is what leads to harmful outcomes in the future like disordered eating.”

Dr. Neumark-Sztainer was overwhelmed by the parents asking her the following questions, “How can I prevent my kids from becoming obese without hurting their feeling and impacting their self-image?”

So what are parents supposed to do? Are they supposed to just stand idly by while their kids become overweight?

In Dr. Neumark-Sztainer’s book, titled “I’m, Like, SO Fat: Helping Your Teen Make Healthy Choices About Eating and Exercise in a Weight-Obsessed World,” she mentions the fact that parents can affect their children’s eating habits without even talking about them. “I promote the notion of speaking less and doing more. Meaning makes your house an area where it is easier to choose healthy eating and more physical activity, as opposed to talking about weight.”

This means for parents to keep healthy food in the house as opposed to junk food and soda. It helps to sit down and enjoy dinners together as a family as well as set being a role model by physically active yourself. You should get the family to go for bike rides or walks. It also means that you should no talk about your own weight. Dr. Puhl said, “These types of actions speak louder than words.”

So when the kids are young you really don’t need to talk about healthy eating habits or weight problems and simply just show them a healthy way of life.

One healthy and fun way to lose weight and get your children involved is to do yoga at home together.

It’s hard not to take notice of fitness freaks and ad banners alike that scream out loud the importance of exercising and having a chiseled body. While it’s safe to not take these call to actions at face value, the fundamental science has remained true since ancient times. Your end goal might not exactly be a chiseled body, but who doesn’t aspire to be more flexible and healthier?

The bright side of the whole situation is that yoga is for everyone. Whether you’re too old a for a walk in the park or you’re auditioning for your local baseball team – yoga is here to assist you for the good.

Why is Yoga Such a Serious Deal?

The uncanny ability of this fitness regime to cater to a wide range of audiences (it doesn’t really matter if you’re 18 or 60) has to lead to its acceptance all over the world. Yoga isn’t about being fit physically – it takes care of the mind too. The various asanas accompany innumerable benefits in their own varying degrees.

Coming to the actual benefits, yoga has been instrumental in improving flexibility, balance, and muscle strength among others.

Recent studies have indicated that practitioners also benefit from better cardiovascular health and a more proactive immune system. Medical science has clinically proven that mental health is just as important. Yoga even helps in tackling the mental onslaught corporate industries bring about in each one of us. Excessive stress and depression are the root causes of suicides around the world. If psychotherapy doesn’t cut it, yoga surely will.

Having said that, the real question boils down to this: how much does an average individual need to invest in this practice in order to reap considerable benefits?

Highway To Health

Here’s the deal: as with every other fitness regime, the more you exercise, the more you benefit from yoga. Experts reckon that once a week should suffice for most people. However, if you’re looking for quick results and have time to spare, three to four times a week would be ideal.

Back pain specialists are also of the opinion that those who try yoga seriously never turn back. A minute of the minute of meditation is enough to bring about positive changes in the outlook of a pessimistic person.

While all this sounds great, it’s important for people to understand the benefits of level-headedness. You won’t be able to twist and turn like Michael Jackson right away – but you’ll notice those improvements soon enough.

Many aspects of yoga compel you to focus on your breathing. This technique allows you to clear your mind from material bondage and experience life in the present. This in turn makes results in a calmer and happier you.

Many do point out that Yoga isn’t as successful as a cardio session at your local gym. You don’t really burn fat, but you’ll surely get oxygen moving around your body much more efficiently. To put things into perspective, better oxygen circulation is a thousand times healthier than burning out calories.

Depending on the class you take and your commitment to it, you will gradually find increased flexibility levels and better toning of your muscles. All this in its totality leads to a stronger back.

Research Findings

Not surprisingly, a study found that these claims are no fluff. A single yoga class was able to reduce depression and anger levels for several inpatients at a popular psychiatric clinic. After these positive outcomes, another study employed hatha yoga classes twice a week on the same inpatients for about twelve weeks. The results were confirmatory in nature again – decreased levels of back pain.

Clearly, research hasn’t been all that kind to those who feel that machine-based workouts are much more effective. Yoga stands just as effective as any other fitness regime on the planet today, notwithstanding the portability it offers.

It’s logical to assume that not everyone would have time for prolonged sessions, but know that even smaller sessions at the comfort of your home can be highly beneficial. The beauty of yoga is that you don’t always been a studio to work out. If you can’t make it, don’t beat yourself over it.

While it’s clearly evident that yoga has numerous physical and mental benefits, there is no particular strategy or a set of rules that can adhere to. Like medical science, there is no diagnosis or a reliable evaluation technique to determine how much yoga you might actually need. However, experienced yogis say that age plays an important role.

So how does it really vary according to age? Does a man in his young twenties need more or less yoga? Here’s how it works: the more fit you are, the less practice you might actually need. Of course, there are no limitations. It’s just that if you’re old, you might need lots of practice to be able to acknowledge benefits.

Amanda Murdock is a qualified instructor at YG Studios. She reckons that frequent practice is essential if you plan to get involved in anything that is physically demanding in nature. Of course, the regular practice also directly implies faster results. A particular genre of yoga to address such fitness enthusiasts has also taken shape in the modern world – power yoga.

Verdict

In an era where healthcare products and services are branded and marketed to a targeted audience, yogis around the world are yet to modernize their ways of promoting the ancient science. But that doesn’t rule out the wonders of the ancient science itself. The 2000s saw the rise of medical marketing, which enabled hospitals and healthcare professionals to reach out to patients with their special services and expertise. In the same decade, yoga grew to become a $27 billion industry, transforming the lives of millions of people and continues to grow in demand.

The bottom line? Hunt down a reliable online yoga instructor for yourself, or just join a class. Time isn’t kind to any of us, but that does not mean that you need to sacrifice your fitness priorities! Too much of anything might be too bad, but a little bit of yoga every once in a while can do a world of good to you and your family.

I gotta say: I had never heard of sacrum problems before I began my Viniyoga instructor training course. Yeah, I knew what a sacrum was, however, my very first instructor training course had never discussed it, and my students had never raised any complaints regarding the matter. I had never had any trouble myself with it. There I went through life just completely ignorant of the matter. Then… I began my Viniyoga instructor training course. Out of nowhere, the sacrum had come to be something of vital importance. I began to hear things like “don’t do this pose if you have sacrum issues,” “to take care of your sacrum, make sure to do this,” “don’t let yourself feel any discomfort in your sacrum,” and so forth.

It’s kind of like when you buy a car in a certain color and then you start to notice it everywhere. Well, it was the same way with the sacrum and how many people had issues with it.

So, in order to be a bit more specific, it isn’t actually the sacrum we may have problems with, but rather the SI, or sacroiliac joints (unless you experience back or hip pain).

Just to remind you of where it is located, the sacrum is right at the bottom of the spine. It happens to be made up of the five vertebrae bones which together are about the size of your hand and are fused together to form one solid base for your spine. The sacrum fits snugly in the middle of your right and left pelvic bones and is joined to them through the SI, or sacroiliac joints.

Sacroiliac Joint Pain Relief During Yoga

Sacroiliac joints happen to be weight-bearing. This is because the sacrum holds a load of your upper body and the forces are transferred through these joints to the pelvic bones. Your weight is then further carried by your legs from there. As with any load-bearing joint, stability is key to being pain-free. Hence several ligaments are in place to bind the pelvis to the sacrum to restrict any over-extended movements.

A certain number of us may have a bit more flexibility in our sacroiliac joints than other people. This is what can potentially cause problems. The sacrum itself may have a tendency to lean forward a bit with respect to our pelvis (which we refer to as nutation) or perhaps a bit back (which we refer to as counternutation). It may lean 5-10% at the very most. However, even this amount of offset can result in a sense of our pelvic area not being stable.

Who may be at risk for such an injury? Well, just about anybody has the potential to suffer sacroiliac joint problems. However, people that fall into the following categories are at higher risk.

Women coming of reproductive age – Essentially the flexibility of their sacrum is to allow the passing of a baby through the pelvic opening. Counternutation is first to provide an opening for the baby’s head to come into the pelvis while nutation then allows the tailbone to move out of the way. The fact is that in pregnant women, relaxin is released, which is a hormone that provides more flexibility for the ligaments so that it can accommodate the process of birthing. If your students have given birth before, are of reproductive age, or are pregnant, they may have more flexibility in their sacroiliac joints.

There are some of use that may have more flexible ligaments than others. This is because some of us happened to be born with more flexible ligaments that allow us to enact more advanced yoga poses. However, this also provides more risk to injury to our sacroiliac joints as the extra mobility in our sacrum is a given.

So the problem may be that when you’re a young girl, you’re trying to put your foot behind your head. When you do this, your sacrum has a great tendency to move out of place, and this is usually on just one side. When it is actually forced out of place, it will tend to pull on ligaments which are meant to maintain its positional integrity. This could cause a sharp pain to arise above one of her hips on one side of her spine. When this happens, it could take a long time for the pain to go away and for this injury to heal because ligaments, like cartilage, are avascular. This means that they get very poor circulation. When parts of the body do not get ample blood flow, they do not get a regular supply of nutrition that provides for the building blocks of healing.

Once you, unfortunately, injury the area, you may just be prone to injure it again. This is especially true if you are practicing yoga that focuses on some extreme poses while you are ignoring the pain signals that your body is sending you. A student may have a “hot sacrum” if it is prone to injury. Women that are suffering from this will need to change their yoga routines as they remain in the healing stage. It is important to practice healing yoga after you are injured to minimize the chances of injuring yourself again.

What Are Ways We Can Minimize Injuries To The Sacrum?

Do not teach asymmetric poses to these students. This is especially true for those where one of their hips is in a raised position curving the spine towards their other hip. However, take a look at Janu Sirsasana which is generally not an advanced pose yet does aggravate sensitive sacrum.

PULLING THE SACROILIAC JOINT

You may take great care when teaching the advanced asymmetrical pose:

Don’t utilize the leverage from your arms to put yourself into this pose when you feel pain in your sacroiliac joints.

Be sure that the bodies of your students are amply trained preceding any attempt to make these advanced poses especially if they cannot yet touch their toes.

Be absolutely sure not to demonstrate advanced yoga poses to your class if you are not properly warmed up yourself. This is the leading cause of injuries to yoga instructors.

Be sure to let your students, as well as yourself, to stop if it hurts.

Don’t show your class too many asymmetrical poses that only involve one side. This can cause accumulating tension on the sacroiliac joints. Let’s take a look at some of the poses I was presented in one of my most recent classes:

We actually did this entire sequence on just one side first while we were holding each pose for 4-6 breaths. We never asked about moving over to the other side or changing the position of our feet and utilizing abdominal contraction to support us.

Can you begin to see issues here? Our left leg remains in a fixed position and means our left side of our pelvis will stay in mostly a forward-facing pose. When you take your spine through a forward bend, side bend, and forward bend, then twist your sacrum tends to follow the motion of your spine. This causes twisting, torquing, and tugging the left sacroiliac joint.

This certain motion happens to remind me of attempting to remove the top part of a plastic bottle. I mean to break the little piece of plastic you would have to keep bending back and forth until it finally came free. This is a similar motion you are doing to your sacroiliac joint. Sure the sacroiliac joint wouldn’t just break off, however, it may destabilize and become more susceptible and vulnerable to injury.

How do we fix this? Change sides more frequently and swap symmetrical poses with asymmetrical poses when it comes to forward bends.

Don’t force them to keep their legs straight during forward bends because it creates what is known as shear stress on their sacrum.

When you create the curriculum of your classes, ensure you don’t forget to include certain poses that will help to stabilize their sacrum.

Now, if you are looking for other ways to help people cure their joint pain, they may want to check out Joint Pain Relief Codes by Jonathan Bender.

Ever heard cellulite referred to as cottage cheese? Well, cottage cheese is something that should just be a term used to refer to the food item. Not a single woman should need to stress out over her thighs, arms, butt, or legs having the appearance of that lumpy, dimpled dairy product. However, it does happen, unfortunately. Even those of us who diet and exercise properly are prone to get cellulite. As a matter of fact, 88% of all women In the US have this unsightly condition. How about we first take a look at the root cause first so that we can better understand a solution that actually works? Then we’ll take a look at how yoga for cellulite is perhaps the better option.

Reported by the news website, The Scientific American, cellulite usually begins to appear as we get to the menopause phase of our lives and our estrogen levels begin to decrease. It generally happens between the ages of 25 to 35 (or sometimes even earlier). As our estrogen levels decrease, our blood circulation does as well. The reduced amount of nutrients and oxygen being delivered leads to collagen production to decrease. This in turn causes our fat cells to increase in number and size. As they start to move through the diminishing layer of collagen, they then create the lumpy appearance we have come to know as cellulite.

Americans, and other Western cultures these days, have become more sedentary. Cellulite wasn’t really cited in medical journals, considered a cultural issue, or thoroughly researched until the 1970s and ’80s. Although the root cause of cellulite is more than just living a sedentary lifestyle, maintaining optimal circulation is more easily fixed with exercise. However, there is a specific set of exercises that can actually accentuate your cellulite. This is why it is important to do the correct set of exercises to tone the muscles directly beneath the fatty skin where cellulite is prominent. If you’d like to take yoga classes online where you can have direct access to any instructor you wish, you can try YogaGlo for free.

Top 5 Exercises To Remove Cellulite From The Buttocks and Thighs

  1. The Plie Squat – Instead of doing squats with our feet apart at hip width and our toes pointing forward, slide your feet out just a bit wider. Also point the toes of both feet to the corresponding adjacent wall, whereas you’d have your left toes pointing toward the left wall and right toes point toward the right wall. Maintain the technique and posture of a regular squat, but during the upward motion, contract the inner thighs. Squeeze your buttocks inward and push your pelvis out when at the top. This is to help you target the inside of your thighs as well as the outer thighs.
  2. Medicine Ball Squats – This is to help you improve your range of motion when doing squats so that you will better target and tone all of the muscles in your hamstrings, quads, thighs, and buttocks leading to cellulite reduction. It is important that you pick a medicine ball that is not too heavy. Feel free to try this exercise without a medicine ball first to ensure you know your current range of motion without causing pain or injury. With your feet approximately shoulder-width apart, hold the medicine ball over your head. Slowly bend your buttocks backward (while gently arching your lower back). Squat down as low as you can comfortably go but be wary of any knee or back pain. Slowly bring your medicine ball down and front with your arms stretched. Top when you have the ball at shoulder level. Though you are concentrated on the ball, ensure your knees remain behind your toes at all times and your chest is pushed up and out. Breathe out and stand up out of the squat slowly while lifting the medicine ball over your head once more.
  3. The Bridge – Get on your yoga mat and lie on your back and rest your arms at your side. Move your feet flat on the floor and under your knees. Move your hips upward toward the ceiling, tightening your buttocks. Your shoulder blades and upper back should push down into the mat. Once you have fully thrust your hips up as high as you can, slowly bring them back down and repeat. Once you are strong enough and able, try this exercise on just one leg at a time while keeping the other leg straight at the knee and parallel to the floor. Switch legs and repeat this exercise.
  4. Mountain Climbers – This is a combination of movements much like Yogalates exercises. You should begin by standing and bend over forward. Place hands on the floor/mat and slide your legs back. This brings you to the plank position. Rapidly move your left knee forward as close to your chest as you can and back again. Repeat this on your right side. Now bring the left knee out to your left side toward your armpit. Bring your leg back so that you are in the plank position and repeat this movement on the right side. Once you have gone through all four of these movements, stand up. Drop down and repeat at quickly as you can!
  5. Resistance Band Side Leg Lifts – Take one resistance band and sit down on your mat. Wrap the resistance band around your ankles. Now lie on your right-hand side keeping your legs straight. Your right elbow and forearm for leverage and stability as you move your left leg up as high as you can. Be sure to keep your knees straight. Bring your left leg back down slowly and repeat this motion for about 30 seconds. Switch sides and repeat.
Now remember that these are just five exercises for reducing cellulite. Some of them are a bit strenuous, but they do work. However, stretching and yoga can be a more effective way to get rid of cellulite. Yoga for cellulite is a bit easier and more relaxing as well.

Yoga for cellulite is so damn effective because of how cellulite forms. Cellulite forms when certain muscles become atrophied, weak, and sloppy. This results in the fat deposits directly beneath the skin to be distributed irregularly. The tissues that connect the skin to the underlying muscle are noted evenly toned. This makes yoga for cellulite an ideal solution to get rid of that lumpy, bumpy looking skin. Yoga will help rid you of cellulite because of how it tones your muscles, relaxes tissues, and restores balance to your physique.

Please remember that diet plays a big role in burning fat and reducing cellulite. That is why we have also reviewed the Cellulite Destroyer System and highly recommend it to incorporate these cellulite remedies into your daily routine.

 

Certain cancers, such as breast cancer, along with its several therapies and treatments may potentially cause symptoms such as decreased range of motion, nausea, fatigue, and general weakness. Exercising and as well as other physical therapies, like yoga, can ease most of these symptoms. It can also help patients feel much better during cancer treatments.. Another positive benefit is that it can be scaled and modified to fit every patient’s unique abilities and needs.

“The practice of yoga has quite a few emotional, mental, and physical and benefits for pretty much all cancer patients,” claims Ann Marie Turo, OTR/L Ann is a yoga instructor that teaches in Dana-Farber’s Leonard P. Zakim Center for just such Integrative Therapies. There, she teaches practices like Hatha yoga, chair yoga, yogalates (which is a Pilates and yoga fusion), Pilates, as well as a foot fitness course.

Breast cancer patients that may experience lymphedema directly after radiation or surgery, Ann claims that yoga may assist them in improving strength and mobility and restoring range of motion in the arms. Yoga is also known to relieve anxiety and stress, which then leads to lower blood pressure and heart rate.

Director of the Zakim Center and Breast oncologist in Dana-Farber’s Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers, Jennifer Ligibel, MD, says, “studies have shown more and more that breast cancer patients practicing yoga report many positive signs. This may include diminished anxiety, increased energy, and generally improved well-being and quality of life”. She also stated, “The very goal of our Zakim Center is to give patients the tools for integrative therapies that hold proven benefits, like yoga, to assist their healing process during and after their regular treatments.”

Certain positive aspects of routine yoga practice involve improved respiratory, bone, and cardiovascular health along with increased body awareness, improved blood flow and a better sleep, mood, and focus. These things are often compromised during cancer treatments.

In addition, Ann claims, “Yoga is a ‘feel-good’ exercise, and it is a tool that you can just about use anywhere – while sitting on a chair, in bed, or on yoga a mat.”

Ann suggests easing into a specific yoga routine known to help with your symptoms. A number of her favorite yoga poses can be done while at a desk or sitting in a chair. View the 6 Yoga Stretches below for a beginner’s guide to stretches and poses that will aid in increasing body awareness and range of motion after breast cancer treatment.

6 Yoga Stretches For Breast Cancer Patients

Firstly, sit at the edge of a chair with your feet parallel, knees above the ankles, rib cage above the hips, and shoulders relaxed.

Neck Stretches

Benefits: Increase range of motion and release tight muscles

Take your right hand over your head and place the middle finger on the left ear. Inhale through the nose as your stomach rises, and exhale through the nose as your stomach contracts and you gently draw your head to the right shoulder. Hold for one to two breaths. Return to starting position and repeat on the other side.

Neck Rotation

Benefits: Increase range of motion and releases tight muscles

Take your right hand and place it in front of the left shoulder. Inhale through your nose as you feel your stomach expand, then exhale and rotate head toward the left. Hold for one to two breaths. Return to the starting position and repeat on the other side.

Shoulder Rolls

Benefits: Increase shoulder awareness and range of motion

Inhale through your nose and raise your shoulders up toward your ears as your stomach expands. As you exhale, roll your shoulders back and down in a circular motion. Repeat three to four times and switch directions.

Goal Post Arms

Benefits: Increase shoulder awareness and range of motion

Inhale through your nose and raise both arms to shoulder height so they look like goal posts. Inhale and hold. As you exhale, raise your arms up one to two inches then return to shoulder height. Repeat three to four times.

Scapular Retraction

Benefits: Increase shoulder awareness and range of motion

Beginning in goal post position, inhale and bring your shoulders back, imagining cracking a walnut between your shoulder blades. Hold for one to two breaths then exhale and release. Repeat three to four times.

Modified Camel

Benefits: Opens chest muscles

Inhale through the nose as your stomach expands. As you exhale, circle the arms around to the back of the chair and hold. Hold for several breaths and then return to start. Repeat three to four times.